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Why is SiteFinity so hard to install?

5 posts, 0 answered
  1. Kris
    Kris avatar
    2 posts
    Registered:
    12 Jan 2009
    17 May 2009
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    Exactly as the question asks - why exactly is this software so difficult to install?

    Yesterday, I downloaded the 3.5 community version because 1) our company uses it and it's good, and 2) it's the best free .NET CMS I can find. However, it shouldn't be this difficult to set up. I shouldn't have to physically have access to the server it's on (to set up the fiddly and specific worker process permissions) and I shouldn't have full administrator access to the server the database is on (same as above - why two admin users for the DB?). This basically means I need either a managed server or have access to one via a generous friend or employer.

    I realised this after the setup failing just before the DB install process, where SF tells me that access to xxxxxxx.tmp on root has failed. Error after error after error, having taken the initiative to remove a string in the web.config that actually blocked custom errors!

    Why shouldn't I go to Umbraco or DNN?
  2. Ivan Dimitrov
    Ivan Dimitrov avatar
    16072 posts
    Registered:
    25 Nov 2016
    17 May 2009
    Link to this post
    Hello Kris,

    Thank you for using our services and your feedback.

    I agree that the installation is not so easy. The problem comes from the executable file which requires some permissions when creating virtual directories. Also, asp worker process needs permissions to write in web.config and App_Data folder.
    However, we are working on improvements regarding Sitefinity installations which we will introduce with version 4.0.

    Here is a useful link with several posts about Sitefinity installation which could help you to sort out some of the problems you have. SitefinityWatch.com

    Let us know if there is anything else that we can do for you.

    Best wishes,
    Ivan Dimitrov
    the Telerik team

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  3. Kris
    Kris avatar
    2 posts
    Registered:
    12 Jan 2009
    17 May 2009
    Link to this post
    I still didn't get it to work, after reading every SiteFinity article known to man. I've given up and taken a look at DNN, and will see how that turns out.

    I have two sites I'm trying to build in SF - one is a server I have full control of (my portfolio site, by the generous employer I alluded to earlier) and shared hosting. It is literally (in every sense of the word) impossible to do because I can't (and am not allowed to) set the permissions on files that you're requiring.

    Yes, please make it easier to install SF. It's an excellent piece of software, and I'm gutted that I can't install it on the shared server.

    Kris
  4. Ivan Dimitrov
    Ivan Dimitrov avatar
    16072 posts
    Registered:
    25 Nov 2016
    18 May 2009
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    Hi Kris,

    Thank you for getting back to me.

    You could try to install Sitefinity using Blank project through Visual Studio running it "as Administrator"

    Regards,
    Ivan Dimitrov
    the Telerik team

    Instantly find answers to your questions on the new Telerik Support Portal.
    Check out the tips for optimizing your support resource searches.
  5. SelAromDotNet
    SelAromDotNet avatar
    912 posts
    Registered:
    18 Jul 2012
    18 May 2009
    Link to this post
    Kris,

    I've never used the installer, so I can't comment on that specifically, but the easiest way I've found to setup a new sitefinity site is to download the blank project and install it locally. Of course, this is under the assumption that  you have IIS, and Sql Server installed on your system. (Sql express is free, and IIS is built into windows).

    Your machine should already have the full permissions needed to initialize the database, etc... so you just need to create a database and user, navigate to your local site and enter the connection string.

    once your site is up and running locally, then you can copy the site files using ftp, then save the database as a backup and import that to your shared db hosting. Most shared hosting providers should have SOME method to allow you to import a database backup.

    you can even set medium trust on your local site to make sure it mirrors the permissions on your live server, so you can correct any issues before you upload. For example, my host makes their medium trust web.config file available for download, so I installed that on my machine so I know if it works on my machine, it will work on the server!

    regarding your last option, I investigated many options before settling on Sitefinity. umbraco at the time also required full trust with hack workarounds just to RUN let alone install. this may have changed but even then we still didn't like it as much as SF.

    If you are a .NET developer, using all of the core best practices like Themes, User Controls, inheritance, and all of that fun stuff, there is NO better option than SF! It's like an extention to asp.net... wrapping a CMS around tools you already know how to use, and use well.

    anyway enough of my Sitefinity commercial! I hope this was helpful, and if I can be of any further assistance in getting your site rolling, please let me know and I'll do what I can to help!
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5 posts, 0 answered